7 Plot-Snakes, Contests, and Confabs (Write Stuff 0313)
THE
WRITE
STUFF
Writing News for the Sunshine State & the Solar System
www. northfloridawriters. org * Editor: Howard Denson * Mar. 2013
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
In This Issue:
NFW to hear plot-snakes author discuss the narrative on Mar. 9 at Webb Wesconnett
Writecorner Press Annual Short Fiction Contest Deadline is Apr. 30
Meet Fracis, Davies, and Boyette Mar. 27 at OP’s Black Horse Winery
Over 100 authors to appear at Amelia Island Book Festival Apr. 26-27
Southern Lit Conference set in April in Chattanooga
Fracis to read from “Go Home” at Greenwich Village college
Bryant Rollins’ “Vera Pilgrim and the Ritual of Dolphins” spans history from slave trade to civil rights movement
Muses tell Joy Smith to go West in next novel
FWA news about meetings, contests, and workshops
Stuff from a Writer's Quill — Nadine Gordimer
Need someone to critique a manuscript?
The Wrong Stuff – Howard Denson
Stuff from Hither and Yon
Writers Born This Month
NFW suspends dues indefinitely
Meetings of NFW and Other Groups
Useful Links
The Write Staff
.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
.
NFW to hear plot-snakes author
discuss the narrative on
Mar. 9 at Webb Wesconnett
.
The North Florida Writers will hear Allen Tilley speak on plot-snakes and the narrative at 2 p.m. Saturday, Mar. 9, at the Webb Wesconnett Library (corner of 103rd Street and Harlow Boulevard, to the east of I-295). The public is welcome to attend.
.
Tilley is author of such academic works as “Plot Snakes and the Dynamics of Narrative Experience,” “An Introduction to Plot in The Modes of Experience,” and “Plots of Time: An Inquiry into History, Myth, and Meaning.” In addition, he has two cookbooks: “Back Porch Feasts” and “Hungry Zen: Vegetarian Meals in Under an Hour.”
.
He is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of North Florida. He moderates the Global Warming Study Group list at UNF, heads the Regional Planning and Development Team and the Residential Green Building Committee for the U.S. Green Building Council of North Florida, is a member of the Emergency Planning Committee of the Regional Community Institute, and serves on the Executive Committee of the North Florida Group of the Sierra Club. He grew up in Paducah, Ky., served as a naval officer in Viet Nam, holds his BA from Vanderbilt and his PhD from the U of Iowa, and has lived in Jacksonville since 1973.
.
For the critiques, someone other than the author of respective works will read aloud the submissions (up to 10 double-spaced TYPED pages of prose, and reasonable amounts of poetry or lyrics). Authors may not defend their work, but they may attach questions they would like answered (e.g., “Is the scene on the beach convincing?”). Authors should listen to the words and rhythms of their creations.
.
Future meeting dates and locales:
.
Mar. 9 – 2 p.m., Webb Wesconnett
Apr. 13 – 2 p.m., Webb Wesconnett
May 11 – 2 p.m., Webb Wesconnett
.
Writecorner Press Annual
Short Fiction Contest
Deadline is Apr. 30
.
Writecorner Press reminds writers that Apr. 30 will be the postmark deadline to enter the 2012-13 contest in short fiction. The First Place Award will be $1,100. Editors' Choice awards of $100 each may be awarded. The maximum length for each entry is 3,000 words. Stories must be original and unpublished.
.
There is no limit on the number of stories entered by any one writer. Stories judged anonymously. Simultaneous submissions are all right, but entrants must notify Writecorner if their story is accepted elsewhere. Authors retain all rights to their works. If the winning story is by anyone attending a college, a university, or a school when the story is submitted, the winner will receive, in addition to the $1,100 award, the $500 P.L. Titus Scholarship. Proof of attendance is required. For full guidelines see http://www.writecorner.com.
.
Meet Fracis, Davies, Boyette Mar. 27
at OP’s Black Horse Winery
.
A “Meet the Authors” session will be held Wednesday, Mar. 27, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Black Horse Winery, 420 Kingsley Avenue, a block west of Park Ave. (Hwy. 17) on the south side of the street. Owner and winemaker Kiyoko Fiedler sponsors this and other cultural events featuring local artists and writers. Guests are welcome at the sessions.
.
The authors will be Sohrab Homi Fracis, Connie Davis, and Sir Ernie Hamilton Boyette.
Sohrab Homi Fracis (www.fracis.com) won the Iowa Short Fiction Award, for “Ticket to Minto: Stories of India and America” (University of Iowa Press). It was also released in India and Germany. An excerpt from his upcoming novel, Go Home, appeared in New York's Slice and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. He is on the faculty of the annual UNF Writers Conference, and was visiting writer in residence at Augsburg College. He was Florida Individual Artist Fellow in Fiction and artist in residence at Yaddo. In April, he will read from “Go Home” at The New School in New York.
.
“Ticket to Minto” is the first book by an Asian to win the Iowa Short Fiction Award, juried by the legendary Iowa Writers' Workshop. Kirkus Reviews described it as "12 finely crafted stories that evoke the tug of tradition all immigrants feel, as well as life in contemporary India.... Quiet, evocative tales illuminating India and the Indian experience in America." A university student rushes to save the life of a servant in his homeland only to find his own life threatened while at graduate school in America. A bullied schoolboy who draws strength from sacred fire in India grows up to breathe in independence from the winter cold of America. The companion stories alternate between the countries and are interrelated across continents in both theme and content, as they create bridges between East and West.
.
Connie Davies’ recent novel “Flicks and Tricks” is a historical love story set in 1912 in Jacksonville. During the period, the Florida city was on the verge of becoming the movie capital of America, but that honor eventually went to Hollywood. It turns out that a quiet Southern city didn’t like movie companies filming car chases, firetrucks speeding off to often false alarms, etc. Davies’ protagonist is a seamstress for a movie company and steps into cinematic fame when she substitutes for an absent actress and captivates the director and onlookers. Her stories have been published in Kalliope and The State Street Review, and she has been a long-time member of Frank Green’s Bard Society. For more information about her, go to http://www.conniedavies.com/AboutAuthor.htm.
.
Sir Ernie Hamilton Boyette is a storyteller, painter, and photographer. His website reveals that he is a raconteur who paints his way and approaches life with a definite perspective. He was named a Knight of Vision http://www.aviationartstore.com/story_About_the_Artist_short.htm
.
Clay County Writers is accepting donations for BASCA, Inc., a local nonprofit dedicated to improving the quality of life for people with developmental and intellectual disabilities.
.
Future “Meet the Authors” sessions are scheduled on April 25, all at Black Horse Winery, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Contact CCW group leader Maureen Jung at mjung@wordspringconsulting.com to arrange to participate as an author.
.
Over 100 authors to appear
at Amelia Island Book Festival Apr. 26-27
.
The 2013 Amelia Island Book Festival will be Apr. 26-27.
On Friday, the Festival will offer all-day workshops on “How to Get Published in the 21st Century” at Yulee’s Betty Cook Center of Florida State College at Jacksonville. The workshops will go from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with the sessions free to students with IDs. Others may purchase early bird tickets at $65 for members and $75 for non-members, with box lunches included. After March 31, all tickets will be $85.
.
This conference is for all writers, from novice to published. Whether a writer is just starting to write, needs direction on how to better market his or her book, or anything in between, authors and professionals will offer tips, advice and guidance on all the ins and out of writing and publishing. This all inclusive event has four sessions per hour all day, and the ticket covers all sessions and a working lunch.
.
On Saturday, a Readers Festival, with free admission, will be held at the Atlantic Recreation Center from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. It will feature local, bestselling and nationally known authors, book signings, publishers and exhibitors, author readings, poetry readings, workshops, panel discussions, storytellers and hands-on projects for children in the Kids Fun Zone.
.
Need to do a map search? If so, instead of being at the church near the town itself, the event will be held at a facility closer to the beaches, at 2500 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. To search for the Betty Cook Center, look up 76346 William Burgess Rd, Yulee, FL.
.
Fiction Authors at the Festival will include Dr. Berta Isabel Arias, J. K. Barber, D. B. Barton, Pamela Beverly, R. E. Bradshaw, Cynn Chadwick, Jaye Cherie, Terri Crews, Moria Crone, William Eleazer, Gerrie Ferris Finger, Sue Chamblin Frederick, Tim Gilmore, Ken Gorman, Diane Harper, Chris Hejmanowski , Denise Hildreth Jones , J. Rivers Hodge, Dr. John House, Emily Louise Jaques, Barry Kelly, Benita Marie Lewis, Erika Marks, June Hall McCash, Eileen McIntire, Michael Morris, Bob Mustin, Ian Murray, Sharman Burson Ramsey, Laura Lee Smith, George Willis Tate, Olivia Taylor, Ron Whittington , and Adele Woodyard.
.
Non-Fiction Authors will include William Abdelnour, Dane Boggs, Pam Brandon, Michael Brewster, Patricia Charpentier, Gay Culverhouse, Ruth Douglas Currie, Michelle Daniel, Sarah Jean Davidson, Bob Dekle, Katie Farmand, Janet Horton, Renee Jones, Jeff Kunerth, Charles Meyers, Roger McIntire, Heather McPherson, Mary Ann Miller, Margaret Mishoe, Stacy Montague, Nancy H. Murray, Jennifer Nelson, Teresa Pawlowski, Samuel Pearce, Nola Perez, Jamie Roush, Drew Sappington, John Saucer, Ted Schroder, Charles Seabrook, Kevin Shipp, Ann Marie Skordy, Mark N. Stageberg, Sherry Ways, Janie Wilkins, Angela Williams, A’ndrea Wilson, and John Zimmerman.
.
Children’s Authors will include Mark Wayne Adams, Kara Anderson, Rose Barnett, Mary Ann Bator-Gray, Greg Burgin, Nancy Cavanaugh, Judy Cayce, Mary Debrick Chudzynski, Nancy Day, Cheryl Dubberly, C. L. Enuton, Rob Hicks, Angela Johnson, Liz Kawecki, Dalen Keys, Holly McClure, Brian McGuffog, Ron Kurtz and Roger Moore, Chris Rumble, Ann Marie Skordy, Susan E. Snyder, and Barbara Spurlin.
YA Authors will include Cali Amber, Kristina Circelli, Gwendolyn Heasley, Rita Malie, Holly McClure, Brian McGuffog, Elle Thornton, Jane Wood, and Bryan Woods.
.
Southern Lit Conference set
in April in Chattanooga
.
Americans typically know the names of Stephen King, Tom Clancy, and maybe one or two other writers, but the Southern Lit Conference in Chattanooga will be attracting many writers who are more skilled. The public will know them more by such book titles as “A Lesson before Dying” or “Cold Mountain.”
.
Dorothy Allison, James Applewhite, Gerald Barrax, Richard Bausch, Madison Smartt Bell, Wendell Berry, Roy Blount Jr., George Core, Elizabeth Cox, Kate Daniels, R.H.W. Dillard, Jerre Dye, Tony Earley, Clyde Edgerton, Claudia Emerson, Wayne Flynt, Charles Frazier, Ernest Gaines, Jim Grimsley, Allan Gurganus, James Hall, Katori Hall, Fred Hobson, Andrew Hudgins, Josephine Humphreys, Rodney Jones, Randall Kenan, Jeff Daniel Marion, Bobbie Ann Mason, Kevin McCarthy, Jill McCorkle, Robert Morgan, Ann Patchett, Jayne Anne Phillips, Sam Pickering, Padgett Powell, Wyatt Prunty, Ron Rash, John Shelton Reed, Scott Russell Sanders, George Singleton, Minton Sparks, Elizabeth Spencer, Natasha Tretheway, and Allen Wier.
.
.
Fracis to read from “Go Home”
at Greenwich Village college
.
Sohrab Homi Fracis, Jacksonville's Iowa Award-winning author (Ticket to Minto: Stories of India and America, www.fracis.com), will read at New York's arts college, The New School, in Greenwich Village on Monday, April 1, at 6:30 p.m. Fracis will read from his upcoming novel, “Go Home,” alongside acclaimed Canadian Indian novelist M.G. Vassanji (The Book of Secrets, etc.), at a literary forum moderated by award-winning NYC author Jeffery Renard Allen (Rails Under My Back, etc.). The event, at Wollman Hall in the Eugene Lang Building, is open to the public. Tickets are $5, available online. http://www.newschool.edu/eventDetail.aspx?id=87195
.
Bryant Rollins’ “Vera Pilgrim and the Ritual of Dolphins”
spans history from slave trade to civil rights movement
.
Bryant Rollins has released his fourth book, “Vera Pilgrim and the Ritual of the Dolphins,” a novel that comes out of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. The book is an epic survey with psychological and cultural contexts. It spans history from the African slave trade to the contemporary challenges of an increasingly multicultural America. Against the backdrop of myth, it vividly brings back the powerful music of the 1960s, the political tensions, the energy and tumult of the movement, the dramatic force of voter registration drives, marches, protests and rallies as the winds of change swept the country. The book employs elements of magical realism to evoke the spirit of that era.
.
Vera Pilgrim, who has survived an abusive childhood to become a charismatic national leader, heads a cast of indelible characters. Parallels between Vera’s life and character, and those of Sojourner Truth, the 19th-century abolitionist and feminist, are central to the novel’s mythic dimension. So are the two compelling dolphins Vera encounters and the ancient ritual they are destined to fulfill together. The book is structured as an extended metaphor. Vera is an archetypal figure who strides across the stage of history engaging historical and fictional people and situations. Flashbacks, twists and turns ultimately lead to an unanticipated and uplifting conclusion.
.
Rollins is a former editor with The New York Times and was a reporter and political columnist with The Boston Globe, where he was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. He was executive editor with The New York Amsterdam News.
.
Muses tell Joy Smith
to go West in next novel
.
Joy Smith’s novel set in the West, “Detour Trail,” has been released by Melange Books, the publisher--and online at http://www.melange-books.com/authors/joyvsmith/detourtrail.html
.
She has mainly written science fiction.
.
In “Detour Trail,” her protagonist Lorrie is westward bound on the Oregon Trail, but she is left behind after her uncle is killed. She later joins another train before leaving the trail completely with assorted companions, including a mule. She discovers that settling the frontier isn't easy.
.
.
FWA news about meetings,
contests, and workshops
.
Victor DiGenti, the regional director of the Florida Writers Assn., gives readers the FWA Blog post about meetings, contests and workshops for NE Florida writers. Click here to access the blog.
.
The
Wrong
Stuff – Forensic Grammar
.
By HOWARD DENSON
.
Follow the link below to find where often sane and sensible writers (and editors) have stumbled in their writing:
http://howarddenson. webs. com/theforensicgrammarian. htm
.
Stuff
from Hither
and Yon
.
Click on each link to go directly to the story.
.
The Spy Novelist
Who Knows Too Much
.
Robert F. Worth writes about Gérard de Villiers, who disturbed the secret intel communities with his pulp-fiction thriller “Le Chemin de Damas.” De Villiers is “an 83-year-old Frenchman who has been turning out the S.A.S. espionage series at the rate of four or five books a year for nearly 50 years. The books are strange hybrids: top-selling pulp-fiction vehicles that also serve as intelligence drop boxes for spy agencies around the world.”
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/03/magazine/gerard-de-villiers-the-spy-novelist-who-knows-too-much.html
.
The Majorcan Who Knew Too Little English,
The Brit Who Knew Too Little Spanish
.
Anna Nicholas writes “British expats aren’t alone in suffering from language fatigue.” A Majorcan friend comes to her to polish her English (and wonders why “hotel” isn’t pronounced like “bottle”). She complains that English is the hardest language to learn, but the writer counters with some peculiarities of Spanish. http://my.telegraph.co.uk/expat/annanicholas/10149499/british-expats-arent-alone-in-suffering-from-language-fatigue/
.
The activists who knew
the whiteness of the whale
.
Publisher’s Weekly announces the publication of “The Whiteness of the Whale” by David Poyer. PW says, “Poyer’s intense, fast-paced prose creates palpable suspense as he vividly describes the miserable close quarters, the terrifying sea and weather conditions, and the gruesome, wasteful destruction of the sea’s largest mammals.”
http://publishersweekly.com/978-1-2500-2056-7?fb_action_ids=489253351130762&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=other_multiline&action_object_map=%7B%22489253351130762%22%3A330060170428350%7D&action_type_map=%7B%22489253351130762%22%3A%22og.likes%22%7D&action_ref_map=[]
.
The computer program that knows
how to reconstruct ancient languages
.
Rebecca Morelle reports for the BBC about a computer program that has taken about 140,000 words and figured out what a language 7,000 years ago was probably like. It doesn’t have the accuracy of a professional linguist, but it is able to speed up the analysis considerably.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21427896
.
Thanks to DNA-style research, we may know
that our languages go back 9,000 years ago
.
Jonathan Ball reports for the BBC News that modern Indo-European languages - which include English - originated in Turkey about 9,000 years ago, say researchers from New Zealand. They used “methods developed to study virus epidemics to create family trees of ancient and modern Indo-European tongues to pinpoint where and when the language family first arose.” http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19368988
.
The editor who knew Auden, Trilling,
and Barzun-type writers (via Simon)
.
Alan Jackson in The American Conservative writes about “What Editors Think of Writers,” starting with an anecdote from John Simon about W.H. Auden, Arnold Trilling, and Jacques Barzun. One turned in sloppy copy and welcomed editing. One argued about proposed changes but would accept some. A third refused to have any changes made. Which do you think you are?
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/jacobs/what-editors-think-of-writers/
.
The humorist who knows
of eight needed punctuation marks
.
In the beginning of writing, there weren’t any punctuation marks (to save space on the i-clay tablet or the i-vellum, but periods, commas, etc. began appearing over time. You would think we have enough of them, but Mike Trapp writes in College Humor that we desperately need eight more.
http://www.collegehumor.com/article/6872071/8-new-and-necessary-punctuation-marks
.
The translator who knows that Germans
are stuck in the 1880s linguistically
.
Brian Melican works as a translator for German and has been following the controversy about ridding children’s stories of racism. Most business communications, he notes, are slanted toward males, partly because German (like Latin and other languages) has genders in its nouns. The masculine dominates many words.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/expat/9883487/Germany-is-linguistically-stuck-in-the-1880s.html
.
Stuff from
a Writer's Quill
.
A serious person should try to write posthumously.
— Nadine Gordimer
.
Need someone
to critique
a manuscript?
.
If you have a finished manuscript that you wished critiqued or proofread, then look for someone at http://howarddenson.webs.com/potentialcritiquers.htm.
.
Writers Born
in March
.
To check out the names of writers who were born this month, go to this website:
http://howarddenson. webs. com/birthdaysofwriters. htm
.
The list includes novelists, poets, playwrights, nonfiction authors, writers for the small and silver screen, and others.
.
Looking for your favorite writer? Hit “find” at the website and type in your favorite’s name. Keep scrolling to find writers born in other months.
.
With misgivings, the list generally omits lyricists (to avoid the plethora of garage-band guitarists who knock out a lyric in two minutes to go with a tune). Often lyricists are accomplished in other writing areas and may cause their inclusion (e.g., Bob Dylan, Johnny Mercer, Cole Porter).
.
Unfortunately, some writers fret about identity theft and will only say they were born in 1972 or whenever. Typically that means they don’t get included on a “born this day” list. Recommendation: Writers may wish to create a “pen birthday”; that way, their names stay on the public’s radar.
.
If you see that we have omitted a writer, give us his or her name (and preferably a way to verify the belly-button day).
.
NFW suspends
dues indefinitely
.
The North Florida Writers has suspended its membership dues for an indefinite period. The treasury has stabilized at a comfortable level, and the NFW does not have any appreciable expenses. Members suspected we could go without dues for a couple of years and perhaps more. During this period, anyone may attend and participate in the monthly meetings. (Even with dues, writers were free to attend a few meetings to see if the NFW would suit their needs.)
.
Meetings
of NFW and
other groups
.
For a listing of meetings of the NFW and other groups in Northeast Florida, click here http://howarddenson.webs.com/meetingsofunfothers.htm
.
Some
Useful
Links
.
Writers, poets, and playwrights will find useful tools at http://howarddenson.webs.com/usefullinksforwriters.htm.
.
THE
WRITE
STAFF
.
President: Howard Denson (hd3nson@hotmail. com)
Vice President: Joyce Davidson (davent2010@comcast. net)
Secretary: Kathy Marsh (kathygmarsh@bellsouth. net)
Treasurer: Richard Levine (RichieL@gmail. com)
.
Presidents Emeritus: Frank Green, Dan Murphy, Howard Denson, Nate Tolar, Joyce Davidson, Margaret Gloag, Richard Levine, Bob Alexander, JoAnn Harter Murray, Carrol Wolverton, Margie Sauls, Stewart Neal.